highlights & insights

Stuff I've done and a thing I won

In 2020 I was a contributor to The Right-Brain Workout 2 by Russell Howcroft and Alex Wadelton. Einstein saw the world through his thought experiments, writers see the world by looking under the veneer. My creative challenge, 100 Words to Set You Free, asks you search for the hidden truths of the world around you because that's where the magic happens.

I wrote the ad copy for the digital-only launch of the new Toyota GR Supra which sold out the $14m of stock in just 22 minutes. No test drives. No dodgy dealers. Just an immersive digital experience and my words. The result earned Toyota $2,317 per second. That's 7 cars a minute. One hell of a fast car, with even faster sales.

A few years ago I wrote a piece for The London Literary Review which discussed the art of hooking readers from the get-go. I'm a firm believer that you should be able to open a book at any page and know instinctively what the story is about and want to read on.

In 2008 I was hired by a production company I knew, that was connected to Jerry Bruckheimer's company, to write the feature film treatment of a story inspired by the Reno Air Races. They took it to Disney. A few years later 'Planes' was released. I'm not saying I had anything to do with 'Planes', but another friend who is a successful film composer said, "You just got fucked by your friend: welcome to Hollywood!" which kinda sums up the cannibalistic part of Los Angeles.

During the 2007 LA Writers Guild of America strike I wrote the novel Self-Affirmation For The Dead. The San Diego Union-Tribune reviewed it: "Holy smokes this is good stuff! The writing is crisp, and there's a laconic edge to the prose, world-weariness that shines through. This is very L.A." You can buy it on Amazon.

Between 2006 and 2008 I wrote freelance for NBC and CBS. I covered CSI:Miami & Big Brother on CBS. For NBC I covered shows including Medium, My Name is Earl, Last Comic Standing (the one that gave Iliza Shlesinger her big break), ER, Saturday Night Live, Baby Boomers, Scrubs, Fear Itself, and of course everyone get to work on Days of Our Lives.

In 2004 I won a BAFTA Rocliffe Screenwriting Award for my adaptation of Tosca, by Puccini, which I set in modern day San Francisco. Iain Softley (K-Pax, Skeleton Key) directed a stage reading in London and he actually said "This could be the best calling card I've come across in a long time. You've created a very powerful script that both parodies and dissects your industry. I want to watch this film." I know he said that because it blew my tiny mind and I wrote it down while he was still talking. Probably should have said 'thanks' instead of being a stunned mute. But it's been on every website I've made. It's yet to pay off...

Back in 1997, before the internet killed the music industry, I was part of a band called The Bond. We released an album titled Beyond Songs and Stories, then broke up in the middle of recording our second album. The legendary Radio 1 DJ, John Peel loved our music and played us on his show.